Minerals | By_Name | By_Class | Gemstones | Aquamarine

Aquamarine Specimens



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# AQU-39, $30.00 Sold!
Dims: 1.06x0.23x0.15in (2.69x0.58x0.39cm) .... Wt: 0.040oz (1.00g) .... Loc: Mt. Antero, Chaffee County, Colorado, USA
This is a single nicely-colored prismatic aquamarine crystal. While it doesn't have crystalline terminations, the ends have a pattern and inclusions that suggest they are natural. The sides of the crystal have a pattern that almost makes the crystal look fibrous (purely an illusion, I'm certain).
# AQU-37, $38.00 Sold!
Dims: 1.14x0.79x0.70in (2.90x2.01x1.77cm) .... Wt: 0.64oz (18.0g) .... Loc: Erongo, Namibia
This appears to be a single aquamarine crystal that fractured, partially healed, and then continued growing. The front of the aquamarine sports several black schorl crystals which give it a nice contrast. Additional schorl crystals are visible inside. Other cavities and grooves contain a light brown material.
# AQU-35, $40.00 Sold!
Dims: 2.20x0.24x0.23in (5.59x0.60x0.59cm) .... Wt: 0.120oz (3.50g) .... Loc: Sherlovaya Gora, Transbaikalia (Zabaykalye), Eastern-Siberian Region, Russia
To my eye, this beryl crystal is distinctly green, so shouldn't it be called emerald? However, its crystal form is very characteristic of many aquamarine specimens, and it comes from a location noted for aquamarine, and if I try real hard I can imagine a hint of blue to its otherwise pale green color. One end shows a basal termination, the other end is fractured. The sides are distorted and deeply striated, giving it more of a round appearance than hexagonal. It is transparent with a vitreous luster.
# AQU-34, $50.00 Sold!
Dims: 2.71x0.29x0.21" (6.89x0.75x0.54cm) .... Wt: 27.5ct (5.5g) .... Loc: Sherlovaya Gora, Transbaikalia (Zabaykalye), Eastern-Siberian Region, Russia
This long, slender beryl crystal is blue enough to be considered an aquamarine, although its hue has a significant greenish cast. It has a distorted hexagonal cross section, with a natural contact termination at one end, and basal cleavage and fracture at the other. The crystal is quite transparent, with a few dark inclusions and a series of basal internal fractures that display as a dozen white zones when the crystal is illuminated with a bright light. The clarity of the crystal is marred by striations running the length of the crystal, leaving only a few thin windows through which one may examine the interior. Other than the fracture at one end, the only dmage is a fracture near the base where the specimen was removed from its host rock. There are a number of contact points and small pits where more of the host rock was removed, leaving small (often dirty) cavities.
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Minerals | By_Name | By_Class | Gemstones | Aquamarine

 

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